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  1. #1
    chasmain's Avatar
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    NYPD Ranks and Progession

    Does anyone know how long, on average, it takes to make Detective on the NYPD?

    If one stays on the Detective career track, can one take the SGT's, LT's and Captain's exams?


    If so, does one stay as a detective while holding the above (assuming one has passed such exames, of course) ranks? Or does the detective need to go back to uniform?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    papimike is offline The kindest moderator
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    Well, the NYPD is an ever changing machine as old Chiefs leave and new jack Chiefs fill their posts. Ego after ego enters into these positions of command and control and they make changes so that they can leave their own personal mark on the dept. So, to answer your questions, right now/at the moment -

    There are numerous ways to make detective, each taking different amounts of time to become detective. We have guys and gals getting recruited into IAB and into special assignments right in the academy - having to come back and finish the academy years later sometimes. You can work in a precinct for a few years and simply apply for a slot in a detective squad, or narco or warrants. If you make some good connections, you can simply ask at any point in your career.

    You can take any exam, as long as you are in the preceeding rank.

    Once you are promoted you move into that new rank. The rules say that you have to go back to uniform for at least 6 months, but rules have been broken and guys have skipped going back to patrol.

  3. #3
    chasmain's Avatar
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    Thanks Papimike.

    I was curious because it seems that those reached the highest ranks in the NYPD progressed from the uniformed, rather than detective, route. This would make sense if the uniformed route provides more supervisory opportunities and experiences.

    Nevertheless, the detective route seems very appealing. Do you or anyone else know if possessing academic credentials that exceed that of most officers help in promotions? Or is it that no one cares at all what degrees you have once you leave the academy?

  4. #4
    papimike is offline The kindest moderator
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    Well, these days, many 'cops' on our job have degrees and advanced degrees. Our Chief of Detectives for example has a bachelors, a masters in engineering, and a law degree. One of my buds was a regualr patrol cop and had a law degree. Etc, etc.

    Degrees don't mean much unless you want to go the supervisory route. Sgt's must have a min of 60 credits, Lt's I'm not sure, but Capt's a bachelors and above Capt I'm not sure.

    And there have been plenty of detectives who have taken the exams and made their way up through the ranks. The key with us is that as a detective you're not a supervisor - you can become a sgt who works in a detective unit, or a Lt who works in a detective unit, etc.. Now although detectives are not supervisors, you do carry some weight amongst supervisors when conducting and directing investigations and crime scenes. You may also perform some supervisory duties, but in the dept's eyes and from a civil service standpoint you are not a supervisor.

  5. #5
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    Thanks. May I ask if you are with the NYPD? I know that to even be an officer one must have either 60 college credits or 2 yrs active duty military.

    Yes, I have heard that captains and above must have a bachelor's degree.

    I would agree that degrees do not mean as much as they used to. Nowadays, it seems like everyone has at least one degree. It's more about where one went to school, what they studied and what their grades were.

  6. #6
    papimike is offline The kindest moderator
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    Yes I'm with the NYPD - on my way out though within a year. Use me while you can, lol.

    And again referring to just how varied 'making rank' can be, one of my buds just got promoted to Assistant Commissioner. His prior assignment was as a lieutenant in the Internal Affairs Bureau (he was a uniformed patrol cop in my old command back in the early to mid 1990's). FYI our rank system is as follows: police officers/detectives, sergeants, lieutenants, captains, deputy inspectors, inspectors, assistant chiefs, deputy chiefs, chief, assistant commissioners, deputy commissioners, first deputy commissioner and commissioner. This massive skipping of ranks is not the norm, but happens. Our former Commissioner, Bernard Kerik, was a detective then got a contract security job in Saudi Arabia, then became warden at a New Jersey jail, then assistant correction commissioner in NYC, then correction commissioner, then police commissioner.
    Last edited by papimike; 08-24-2011 at 00:49.

  7. #7
    chasmain's Avatar
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    Thanks. I will certainly utilize your knowledge. From what I understand, commissioner ranks are a bit different. Aren't they more like civilian appointments rather than a progression from the ranks?

    On another note, I did not tell my employer that I applied to NYPD. At what point in the investigative process will they contact both my prior and present employer as well as my references?

  8. #8
    papimike is offline The kindest moderator
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    Yes, the commissioner slots are civilian. On a yet further interesting note, the ranks above captain are still officially captains. -as per civil service laws/rules/regs. When they are promoted they are considered, "police captain serving as" a deputy inspector, inspector, chief, etc
    Detectives are the same - under civil service statutes we are "police officers serving as detectives".

    My buddy for example that went fro Lt to Asst Commissioner. He had 23 years on the job. He retired as a lt, but then was rehired as Asst Comm. This means he gets his lt pension and his new salary as Asst Commiss, which will also lead to another pension if he stays in that title long enough.

    You can request that they not contact your employer until literally a week or two prior to the academy. Will they honor this request? Usually.

  9. #9
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    Thanks. How much time will give you until the academy date? I'd like to give proper notice, if possible. Years ago, I heard of people getting called to the academy about a week before the class started.

    Secondly, I don't have any issues in terms of drugs/alcohol/arrest record. I have heard that even people with non-violent felonies have been hired by the NYPD. Is this true? Do people with misdemeanors get hired?

    In any event, I have never been arrested, have excellent credit and work history. I am also in decent shape (what events do they test for physical fitness?)

    Does this mean that I should have no problem getting an offer? What are the usual stumbling blocks for most candidates?

  10. #10
    papimike is offline The kindest moderator
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    Academy date notifications vary from months to hours.

    Regarding arrests, basically every dept hires people who have prior arrests. Arrests are not the issue, it's convictions that count. A felony arrest or multiple arrests with no convictions will warrant questioning by the background investigator - but the arrests alone are not automatic disqualifiers.

    You being hired sounds possible, but there are numerous factors involved - pass the psych written and oral exams, reference checks with neighbors, etc..

  11. #11
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    Thanks. I do not anticipate any issues, but then I do not know what kind of profile they are really looking for.

  12. #12
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    papimike, thanks for your response to my PM query.

    Do you or anyone else know why NYPD does not poly? I think it's NY statewide policy.

    I assumed that polys was standard stuff for most LE jobs, although I do know that DSS does not for some reason.

  13. #13
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    Hi,

    I am scheduled for a physical with the NYPD soon and am told that if I pass that, I will start the "character" process.

    Is it at this point that the NYPD will start contacting my previous employers/references at that point?

    Or is there simply fingerprinting at this point? I believe there is a psychological test to follow during some later point in the process.

    I simply want to be sure that I want to pursue this opportunity before I start bugging my references about it.

    Do you know if the contacting of references is typically the last stage of the hiring process?

    As I posted, I also applied to the SFPD and would like to keep my options open.

    Many thanks for any help/info you could provide me.


 

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