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  1. #1
    vt77 Guest

    icon17.gif Navy Reserve - Intelligence Field Questions

    I have a few questions regarding the Navy Reserve Intelligence, direct commission program.

    How long is the overall Intel position training if you are accepted into the DIRCOM program (after the initial 2 week basic course)?

    Are you deployable before your training for the Intel position is over?

    Do you drill at all before you get your full security clearance?

    Do Intel reservists have to qualify in any weapons trainings (small arms)?

  2. #2
    Porttop79 is offline Officer
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    Navy intel

    It is my understanding that the Navy offers a direct commission option to reservists who are interested in the Intel field (among others) anyone have any info on this program or any like it>?

    Thanks!

  3. #3
    Terps_97 is offline Registered User
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    Quote Originally Posted by vt77 View Post
    How long is the overall Intel position training if you are accepted into the DIRCOM program (after the initial 2 week basic course)?
    Not absolutely sure on this one, but after the 2 week basic course, it's probably mostly OJT.

    Quote Originally Posted by vt77 View Post
    Are you deployable before your training for the Intel position is over?
    Considering the formal training is only two weeks long, there's probably no better way to get your OJT than in a deployed environment. So after the two weeks, I would say you are definately deployable. Keep in mind (and you can find this by fishing around on the Navy Reserves website) that they are only direct commissioning those who 1) have a college degree; 2) have an intel background (ie: prior service, civilian 0132, etc...). The idea is that you come into the program already having the experience needed to fill the position. The two week course is only to introduce you to the Navy's way of doing things, military rank, customs and courtesies, and to give you an overall sense of how to do things as an officer.

    Quote Originally Posted by vt77 View Post
    Do you drill at all before you get your full security clearance?
    Yes. You will be given an interim clearance if your BI has not been completed and adjudicated.

    Quote Originally Posted by vt77 View Post
    Do Intel reservists have to qualify in any weapons trainings (small arms)?
    Yep. It might not be all right away, but you will.

  4. #4
    krellum's Avatar
    krellum is offline 'cause Sgt. D is comin'
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    The training for intel DIRCOMS consists of a two-week DCO school. This is often referred to as "knife and fork" school, teaching you how to be an officer, basic military stuff. It's in Pensacola, FL, but is moving to Newport, RI in January. Then there's 8 months (not 8 solid months, but 8 drills) of intel specific training at your local reserve center. After the 8 month course, there's a two-week intel course at Dam Neck, VA.

    After all that AND a clearance, pack you bags. Before any of those steps are completed, the possibility of deployment is pretty slim.

    And yes, as soon as you're commissioned, you start drilling. Your unit will grant you an interim Secret, which is all you need for the training.

    k
    "I don't share your greed...the only card I need...is the Ace of Spades, the Ace of Spades..."

  5. #5
    vt77 Guest
    Thanks for the info.

    when you say "After all that AND a clearance" how long does a clearance usually take before they can deploy you? I've heard Intel deployments are pretty common, between 6 months to a year, is this pretty accurate?

    Thanks again

  6. #6
    krellum's Avatar
    krellum is offline 'cause Sgt. D is comin'
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    Deployments depend on what kind of unit you're in, really. That can also determine WHERE you're deployed. Plenty of people get activated and stay in CONUS. It's pretty much a given that everyone will go eventually. Many people who have been in since before 9/11 have been deployed two or more times already, so they're not going unless they want to, which means anyone coming in now is the newest "volunteer" on the chopping block. Right now, people are trying to find deployments thay WANT to go on and volunteer for them instead of waiting until the Navy picks one for you. I.e. people are looking for CONUS stuff or things that specifically interest them instead of waiting to get deployed and attached, for example, to an Army unit that already has enough intel support, so you get to do something else (like be the Colonel's personal assistant). Happened to a guy in my unit. I can think of better ways to spend a year.

    But again, you have to have a clearance and you have to be trained, and the clearance can take anywhere from 6 months to 2 years from the time everything is submitted. On top of that, I was told that it's unlikely that an Ensign would be all that useful in the field due to general inexperience. That's unless they have a huge amount of Navy-specific intel expereince, like being a prior Navy enlisted intel specialist (plenty of those around). This means they're usually tapping 0-2's and 0-3's.

    But while you obviously need a degree, you don't need intel experience to be selected. Plenty of new officers have none at all, including yours truly. Law enforcement officers, financial managers, stockbrokers, elementary school teachers - I have met all types. The kicker is impressing the officer recruiter enough with what you already have on your resume to get them to give you the time of day, then likewise impress everyone else throughout the process.

    Small arms training: remember that this is intel. Powerpoint training would be much more useful. You are not a triggerpuller, but support for the triggerpullers. You'll get a chance to fire the pistol and qualify for the pistol ribbon at DCO school, but then you'll probably never see one again unless you get assigned to a unit that quals regularly and they invite you to participate (think Seabees, NSW, etc.), know someone with a "hookup" who can get you out on a Saturday to shoot with their unit, or get deployed. In the case of the latter, I believe they are still sending everyone to Fort Jackson, SC to go through a 2 or 3-week predeployment school with the Army. Plenty of shooting there, I'm sure.



    k
    Last edited by krellum; 12-08-2006 at 18:58.
    "I don't share your greed...the only card I need...is the Ace of Spades, the Ace of Spades..."

  7. #7
    Porttop79 is offline Officer
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    Navy intel

    So is there any hope for those of us with graduate degrees and LE experience and whatever who want to do this, yet may lack Intel experience?

    Thanks!


  8. #8
    vt77 Guest
    Real good info.... i was just curious on the small arms... i grew up on an army base and i remember seeing a lot of the army intel guys carry sidearms.

    On a side note, I've also heard of some of the Navy Intel guys being assigned to NCIS units altough I'd imagine this is few and far between.

  9. #9
    LA Express's Avatar
    LA Express is offline Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by vt77 View Post
    On a side note, I've also heard of some of the Navy Intel guys being assigned to NCIS units altough I'd imagine this is few and far between.
    I wouldn't say it's few and far between. Intel and NCIS naturally work together quite often, with Intel supporting a large number of NCIS CT and CI projects. While relationships will often vary by location, it's usually a mutually productive relationship. There have been tensions, differences of opinion, turf issues, and the like, but this is understandable since the missions converge on numerous levels. In very basic terms, ONI gathers intel for the USN "warfighting machine," as I've heard 'em term it, and NCIS is responsible for all CI/CT matters as they pertain to the Dept. of the Navy. Naturally those two areas converge quite often, which is why you'll find ONI and NCIS working together quite a bit.
    Last edited by LA Express; 12-09-2006 at 10:59.
    --LAE

  10. #10
    Porttop79 is offline Officer
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    Navy Intel

    So is there any hope for someone interested in the Navy Reserve Intel Field Direct Commissioning Program who may have LE experience and other quals but no (or not a lot of ) Intel experience?

    Thanks!


  11. #11
    krellum's Avatar
    krellum is offline 'cause Sgt. D is comin'
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    The Navy Reserve side of NCIS often recruits for folks, so your chance at getting there if that's what you want is probably pretty good - better if you already have law enforcement experience, but good just the same.

    As far as the what you'll do, LA is spot-on: it varies by region. I know a guy in the Northeast who is constantly out doing surveillance and other CI/CT-type stuff during his weekend drills and supporting the NCIS office on AT's (2-week drills). In my unit, we don't do all that much along those lines and instead do mainly Navy admin stuff and give the occasional brief on threats to nearby units. This is because it seems that the NCIS field office in my region doesn't "trust" the NCIS reservists to do anything more than conduct research from behind a desk. When I spoke with an agent here, he all but told me that flat-out, and the SAC and ASAC seemed to echo the same sentiment in a roundabout way when I met them.

    In all fairness, from what I've seen, they have some good reasons for that mistrust, like having to deal with reservists identifying themselves as "NCIS agents" during operations when they're really not, etc. Remember that vast majority of NCIS reservists (at least in my unit) don't come from LE, so you end up having officers - and not just JO's, but 0-4's and O-5's (people who should be mature enough to know better) - who are totally enamored with the fact that they get credentials and get to work in plainclothes, sans uniform, much like a brand new rookie agent in any other agency who thinks it's cool to carry a gun. They give briefs and people assume that they're agents, yet they do nothing to say otherwise.

    These folks mean well, but there aren't enough NCIS reservists with LE backgrounds to create a culture of "don't be stupid and act like a newbie agent." And even if we had more, would an Ensign with LE experience be right to tell a Commander not to get all hyped up because he gets to wear plainclothes and flash creds at someone? Not THIS Ensign .

    On the other hand, if you can arrange to get activated in an NCIS slot, you probably WILL get to do some cool stuff on the ground somewhere OCONUS, but you could also get activated in a "regular" Navy intel slot and end up standing watches in Hawaii (nice place, not as great of an experience). Once you have a clearance, though, you can start shopping around for a deployment you like, such as getting attached to a riverine unit, etc.

    Oh, and yes, you can get commissioned based on nothing more than LE background - i.e. with zero intel experience. I did, and so have many others.

    k
    Last edited by krellum; 12-09-2006 at 23:41.
    "I don't share your greed...the only card I need...is the Ace of Spades, the Ace of Spades..."

  12. #12
    Porttop79 is offline Officer
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    Navy Intel Reserve

    So do these recruits go through CITP, like with OSI In the USAF reserve?

    Thanks!


  13. #13
    krellum's Avatar
    krellum is offline 'cause Sgt. D is comin'
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    Not that I know of. No one in my unit has, anyway. There's probably some follow-on training for those who get activated.

    k
    "I don't share your greed...the only card I need...is the Ace of Spades, the Ace of Spades..."

  14. #14
    Porttop79 is offline Officer
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    Navy Intel Reserve

    So should I even bother applying for this program if I don't have any significant INTEL experience?

    Thanks!


  15. #15
    krellum's Avatar
    krellum is offline 'cause Sgt. D is comin'
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    But while you obviously need a degree, you don't need intel experience to be selected. Plenty of new officers have none at all, including yours truly. Law enforcement officers, financial managers, stockbrokers, elementary school teachers - I have met all types.
    Oh, and yes, you can get commissioned based on nothing more than LE background - i.e. with zero intel experience. I did, and so have many others.

    As I already said twice, no, you DO NOT need intel experience to receive a direct commission as an intel officer (I'm not sure if you're missing these responses or not).

    As to whether you should "bother", that's up to you. Believe me, I really didn't think I had a snowball's chance in hell, especially being older than the average Ensign (by about 15 years) AND being a former Marine on top of that. I didn't really look at it as a "bother" though - I looked at it as a shot that might work out or might not. The effort required was simply going through a couple of interviews and submitting some paperwork, much like applying for a LE job.

    k
    "I don't share your greed...the only card I need...is the Ace of Spades, the Ace of Spades..."


 
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