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  1. #1
    FutureSwatCop Guest

    Typical day in the life of 11B?

    Greetings,

    The recruiting office told me that if I went 11B, my typical day non-deployed, while in garrison (at base?) would be get up in the morning, PT, eat, training (shooting, lasertag like stuff?), train (CQB, missions?), and get home by 3pm.

    What's the truth? I have reasons to doubt his honesty, and I want to be sure. What will my typical day be like as an 11B?
    How about if I go airborne (my recruiter said if I got my ranger contract and failed ranger school, then I would be with the 82nd airborne). Typical ranger day?

    Thank you all for your honest help.

  2. #2
    kennethm3's Avatar
    kennethm3 is offline Chief
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    More like

    wake-up
    PT
    Shower
    Breakfast
    Clean gear
    Lunch
    Clean gear
    Dinner


    Wake-up
    PT
    Shower
    Breakfast
    Move gear around
    Lunch
    Put gear away
    dinner

    Wake-up
    PT
    Shower
    Breakfast
    Inspect gear
    lunch
    put gear away
    dinner

    Plan on shooting once a quarter at best, when doing lane training expect to say "bang bang" a lot because there are no blanks available, lots of informal training at the squad level. Most of you existance will entail getting ready for the next deployment or exercise, going on that deployment or exercise, then returning and preparing for the next. Look for an Airborne Regiment and/or go Ranger. Good luck.

  3. #3
    MissingLink's Avatar
    MissingLink is offline Rookie
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    Just a side note: if you sign up for a guaranteed shot at becoming a Ranger, you won't go to Ranger school right after basic, you will go to Airborne then RIP (Ranger Indoctrination Program). Never been through it myself, but it sounds tough. And that's just the beginning. The Rangers are one of a very small number of units in the Army with summary release authority: if a Ranger fails to perform to standard after adequate counseling and training, he will be released. Of course this is necessary as they are the finest light infantry force in the world. Best of luck in whatever you decide.

  4. #4
    krellum's Avatar
    krellum is offline 'cause Sgt. D is comin'
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    I can't speak to being an 11B in the Army, but having been the Marine Corps. counterpart - the 0311, basic infantryman, or "grunt", I second Kennethm3's analysis. You may actually get to DO the things the recruiter mentions, but you probably won't do them wth the frequency he may allude to. Lots of weapons cleaning, sitting around, waiting for stuff to happen so that you can take part, more weapons cleaning (who the heck do you think cleans everything in the military? The grunts, the bosun's mates, etc. Well, the bosun's mates are smarter than that: they just paint over the dirt again...and again....and again - that's why many of our Navy's ships are so thick ).

    Seriously, being a grunt is, in my opinion, a great experience. You take a certain amount of pride in knowing that when it really comes down to "locating, closing with and destroying," you're the tip of the spear.

    k

  5. #5
    Rooster5150 Guest
    It's been awhile but I did the Ranger guaranteed contract thing. It was very tough. After Airborne School (which is very easy) they send a couple of Guys down to grab you right after Graduation. We put our A bag on our back our B bag across the top of that and they ran us up to the top of the hill where the 3rd Bat Barracks are at a very high rate of speed. DO NOT FALL OUT! If you do you will be very sorry.

    We did 3 weeks of RIP and worked very long hours. We got to the chow hall and they told us "don't bother grabbin a fork just get a spoon you don't but a few minutes to shovel as much food into your pie hole as possible". It was less than 5 minutes. We lost a few who refused to jump at night. They subsequently had their jump wings cut off their BDU's in front of everyone else and were released. We lost a lot on the last day too. They just decided it wasn't for them and a whole bunch of guys just quit. We had a truck load of guys that had to get an IV after the timed road march too. The timed 5 mile run seemed all up hill a very steep hill. Its challenging but doable but if you fail it's off to Andy's Airplane gang or AA better known as the 82nd.

    From RIP you go to Battalion. At your BAT you get picked on smoked and harrassed by everyone with a tab until your squad decides you are squared away enough to attend Ranger School. You must passed the PT test with I think it's either 80 or 90% at the 18-21 year old standards regardless of your age.

    When you are sqared away you get sent to Pre- Ranger which is significantly harder than RIP. Before you go your Squad smokes the ever lovin bejesus out of you because when you come back with your tab they will not be able to do so anymore.

    This is where I might be off because it's been so long. Ranger School was very tough. We had The Darby, mountain, desert and swamp phases and got one MRE a day with little to no sleep. I don't know if that is the case anymore. It was very hard to make it through without being recycled for atleast one phase because 2 no go's and you are recycled. You could get a no go for someone else not being sqared away when you are the TL. You are always tired and hungry and to me it was physically tough and I am a pretty stout guy. I seemed to remember one night after a long hump we thought we were gonna get some rest and an RI said, "Open your MRE and take out you chicklets. Put them in you mouth. Chew! (after 20 seconds) Spit it out! Now, close your eyes. (after 20 seconds) Open your eyes. You just ate and slept now MOVE OUT!"

    I would never do it again but I would never trade it either. There are no easy days EVER, but I didn't want to be a dirty, rotten, stinkin, nasty leg.
    Last edited by Rooster5150; 03-02-2004 at 15:58.

  6. #6
    gijoeyl33 Guest
    11B in garrison doesnt do EDITED. you sit around all day wondering what youre supposed to be doing, then when its go home time the commander dreamed up some "pertinent" stuff that had to be done "right now". you might be more happy in a job that has a day to day mission

  7. #7
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    Originally posted by gijoeyl33
    11B in garrison doesnt do shit. you sit around all day wondering what youre supposed to be doing, then when its go home time the commander dreamed up some "pertinent" stuff that had to be done "right now". you might be more happy in a job that has a day to day mission
    Yeah, maybe like mechanic.

    Rooster5150 pretty much hit the nail on the head for the basics of life in a Ranger Bn. for a private. Things don't change much.

  8. #8
    FastDak911's Avatar
    FastDak911 is offline Sergeant
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    I wasn't 11b or Ranger but I was 19d Cavalry Scout. You don't do EDITED in garrison. If your a regular 11b which last I heard in June of last year was all infantry except for Mortars (11c's) are 11x now. If you end up on a Bradley good luck! All you'll do it Maintenance. When you go to the field you'll do more Maintenance. And when your Vehicle isn't broke down they you'll play war games. If I when infantry I would try my hardest to go 11c oh yeah I was cross trained 11c but was a Heavy Scout. I know it sounds like complaining but I wouldn't trade what i learned as a Scout for anything. I had a ton of fun doing it. I went to korea from Ft. Carson being a 100% Heavy Scout which was pretty much a Mini Tanker to going to a Heavy Scout Platoon. We drove Brads but in Korea we did a lot a Light Recon. I loved it. Nothing like hiding in the woods waiting for the enemy and then bringing everything on them with out them knowing what hit them.

    Combat arm's period is a lot of bs well in garrison but in the field makes up for it all. Just weird sleep habits like sleeping during the day waiting for it to get dark.

  9. #9
    Swat1 is offline Rookie
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    The Truth

    The down and dirty of your situation seems to me like this:

    Your recruiter is blowing smoke up your ass to fill a hard to fill MOS and meet his quota.

    You need to do what is right for YOU not what is right for your recruiter.

    Swat1*

  10. #10
    SUA SPONTE Guest
    Rooster's description of Ranger Batt life was pretty spot on. In addition to that I would add that you will shoot at least twice a month in Battalion (probably more). Training will be more realistic. You will see the Shoot House at least once a month. You will find that you feel like quitting at least once a week (while you're a private). You'll find that it seems like your Team Leader wants to fire you at least once a week.

    And most importantly, if you choose the life of Ranger in the 75th Ranger Regiment... You will be going to War.

    Think long and hard before you choose this route, but it is the best place I've ever been.

    SUA SPONTE

    Former Ranger Team Leader, 1st Ranger Battalion
    Last edited by SUA SPONTE; 03-07-2004 at 05:13.

  11. #11
    zz25 is offline Officer
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    Rooster and Sua Sponte are dead on. I was at 1st Bat from 94-96 and went to School in 94. Day to day depended on what kind of platoon you were in. If you were in a "mech" company or platoon (RSOVs-Ranger Special Ops Vehicle, cut-down Land Rovers), you spent a bunch of time at the motor pool doing modifications to the jeeps and motorcycles. I was a mortar gun team leader. We spent so much time doing crew drills, I can't even begin to explain. Of course, good PT every day. Shoot at least once a month. Ditto for jumping, day and night time patrols, live fire exercises, etc. Lots of weapons maintenance, and smoking privates before, during, and in-between. Life sucks before you get your tab. No two ways about it. It really sucks. But when you come back with your #$%^, there's no feeling like it. Having that tab on top of the scroll is a great thing. I left battalion to go be an SF medic and spent more time in SF; however it is hard to beat the pride and espirit-de-corps that comes from growing up in Battalion. If you're going to be an 11B, it's the only place to do it. Best of luck.----------ZZ
    "Do what you can, where you are, with what you have."

  12. #12
    spaghetti's Avatar
    spaghetti is offline Cadet
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    Hey,
    I would have to agree with SWAT1. Your recuiter is blowing something up your ass all right. I thought 11B was everything you thought is was. Its not!!! The training CAN be pretty fun, but when you have 5-6 NCO's who think that there way is "the right way", the training is no longer fun. It turns into a giant C**K fight between them.
    Being deployed is something that really changes your mind about staying in or getting out. Iraq showed me that 11B just isn't for me.
    I know I'm just blabering, but give it a shot anyway. Some guys love it and some..don't. Good luck!!

    -spaghetti

  13. #13
    MissingLink's Avatar
    MissingLink is offline Rookie
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    Another thing to consider is if you don't make it through RIP you will not necessarily go to the 82nd. A couple buddies from OSUT ended up in Korea after getting booted out of RIP. Ditto for the 18X guys, most are going to the 82nd but Korea seems to be pretty common as well. Bottom line: don't quit. And believe me, there will be many days that you will want to, but nothing is worse than the life of an OT. Good luck.

  14. #14
    MacLeod's Avatar
    MacLeod is offline Super Moderator
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    I think Swat and Spaghetti have an axe to grind and it's not fair for either of them to criticize the actions of a recruiter they don't know. Recruiters get a bad rap. Granted there are bad recruiters out there, just like there are bad cops. I for one, hate it when the stigma is applied across the board. And for argument sake, 11B is not as hard to fill as you might think.

    11B may or may not be for you. I think you've gotten several good posts with a variety of perspectives on life in garrison vs. life in the field. Most will agree, that life in garrison can take on many roles, and not all associated with being an infantryman--post support details come to mind. Good thing about specialized units like the Rangers is they are never tasked with post support, atleast they weren't at Ft. Benning. Life in the field has its challenges as well. Big difference between training exercise and RWD (Real World Deployment).

    One thing is for sure, being an 11B either at the 82nd, 75th RR, 3ID or any other Division, is challenging and rewarding. You'll get out exactly what you put in--no more and no less.


    28:1 The wicked flee when no man pursueth: but the righteous are bold as a lion.


 

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