Hello and welcome to our community! Is this your first visit?
Register

Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Pay System

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    112

    Pay System

    Just read my local department's pay structure, then took into account overtime and hours worked. How does it add up?

    So if base pay is $40,000 a year you would make $60,000 a year with overtime; but work hours being minimum 40 hour weeks and common 50-80 hour weeks... are those extra hours worked off the clock/at home, or am I missing the formula?

    Base pay 40k a year divided by 52 week by 40 hours is $19.23 an hour, but say you work 55 hours per week, that's 19.23 * 40 + 28.85 (1.5 * 19.23) * 15 (55 hours - 40 hours) which is $1,201.95 a week or $62,501.4 a year.

    Just curious how the pay structure for on-call employment is.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    CA!
    Posts
    2,035
    Not real clear on your post, but I think I get what you're asking... If this doesn't answer your question, then maybe someone else will chime in.

    In those agencies and positions that are not FLSA exempt (meaning you earn overtime), you generally get paid 1.5 times your hourly rate for any hours worked in excess of 40 per week. Some agencies will pay you anything over 8 hours (or 10 hours, or 12 hours, depending on the type of schedule you work) as overtime. So if you work 5 days a week 8 hours a day (assuming you get a paid lunch) you would earn 1.5 times your rate for every hour worked over 8 that day. So if you work 9 hours today you get 1 hour of overtime, even if you take the rest of your work week off on vacation or sick leave, etc.

    Some other places say your overtime is only for all hours worked in excess of 40 in the pay period. So if you work 20 hours one day, but only 5 the next four days you would be at 40 hours and hence no overtime. Most places (associations/unions) try to avoid this practice as it does tend to cut into the overtime people get paid. In these same agencies, if you call in sick one day or take a vacation day, then any hours worked past your normal shift the days prior would be calculated at straight time (as you didn't work you full 40 hour normal work week, you took a day off).

    As for what type of overtime you make. Again this varies. In most jobs you get paid for hours you actually are at work doing your normal job. For law enforcement it's a bit different. You certainly would get paid for holding over to cover a short shift, to write reports, late calls, etc. In addition you would also get paid for court as well. So although you might be in a suit sitting around a courthouse all day waiting to testify for 20 minutes on the stand, you would get paid for each hour you were there. In addition many contracts state you get paid a minimum amount of hours when you have court. So if you show up at 08:00 AM for court and testify right away and are all done by 08:30 AM you would still get paid for a 3 hour or 4 hour call back (even though you only actually worked 30 minutes). Again this varies with the particular agency and labor contract/rules.

    Still in addition to this, many places have off-duty work agreements or similar setups which allow officers to work various assignments being paid for by other private/public entities. First example coming to mind would be the NFL hiring off-duty officers to work football games and other sporting events. Again you would be in uniform working in your law enforcement capacity, but being paid by the company/organization requesting the police services. This pay is made to the department who in turn pays you the overtime on your check as you would normally receive it.

    Kahuna
    Humuhumunukunukuapua'a

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    112
    I believe the answer (based on your reply) I was looking for is that some occupations require a contract that gives you extra pay based upon overtime hours calculated; however, they expect you to work X-number of hours each week and if you work less/more you still get paid based on that X-number of hours. So a set salary instead of hourly.... so me taking the salary diving it by weeks and 40 hours a week is irrelevant due to a salary-based (fixed paycheck) pay system.

    Correct?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    CA!
    Posts
    2,035
    Again it just depends. It depends on the labor agreement/contract between the employee association and the employer. Some departments here in CA pay an hourly rate. Again you may earn overtime for all hours in excess of your normally scheduled hours worked *PER DAY* regardless of how many hours you work in the pay period total. Still others will pay overtime for any hours worked in excess of the total normally scheduled hours for the entire pay period. Again this would prevent you from getting overtime if you took a day off on vacation or sick leave during the pay period as you would be under your total scheduled hours for the week.

    You may have an hourly rate you are paid which will cause your paychecks to fluctuate a bit (so those months with an extra week in them you would get a higher check due to the extra hours worked) while still others pay you based on a salary so you get the same pay check each week minus any extra overtime. Even with a salary position they are going to calculate an hourly rate to base your overtime on.

    Overtime tends to be available in many law enforcement jobs. It's the nature of the beast with police work. You might be just 30 minutes from the end of your shift when some call comes out which holds you at work for hours after quitting time. You may have a month where you get subpoenaed to court for various cases all of your days off. Might be a month where a lot of people are calling in sick so you have to cover your shift and all or part of the next shift which might be short.

    In a "normal" job you often hold work over till the following work day with no real issues. In law enforcement you may have to get a report done before morning as the person you just arrested will be going to court the following day. Lots of variables. Best advice would be to talk with some employees from the agency you're looking at to determine what the pay/overtime situation is like. Many other states have public webpages on the Internet which let you look up government worker salaries and overtime. Lots of ways to see what is happening in a particular agency budget/pay/overtime wise.

    Good luck!

    Kahuna
    Humuhumunukunukuapua'a

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    112
    Thank you!


 

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •