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Thread: staying warm

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    56

    staying warm

    How do most of you layer your clothing in cold weather? Do you find it more effective to layer stuff under your body armor or over it? Any good gear tips out their besides under-armour?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    46
    I used to layer over my vest. That way, I could actually take it off. Essentially, I found with a Starter under shirt (Wal-mart's version of UnderArmor), my vest and a long-sleeve uniform shirt that I was good for 95% of the time. I would keep a jacket in the trunk for the last 5%.

    As a patrol officer, I wasn't out of my car or out a building for long stretches MOST of the time. The occasional investigation had me out for long stretches, but normally I could take breaks to warm up or conduct the investigaton inside a warm building (where the incident took place).

    The last things that I would highly recommend is a good pair of patrol gloves (or two in case you get a pair soaked) and if possible a hat. Wearing them helped a ton in keeping warm. But, with the gloves, make sure you practice doing things with them. It may not seem like much but make sure you spend time at the range shooting with your gloves and if possible some time in DT working with your gloves doing typical task like cuffing. You need to be comfortable with anda without the gloves on.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    USA
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    183
    First of all avoid cotton, if you perspire under all your clothing the cottons gonna get soaked and keep the moisture close to your body, making you a lot colder. I also have a cheap underarmor tshirt for my base layer that I wear under my bodyarmor which is polyster and spandex. If its really cold, like below zero, which it often is in MN, I usually wear a layer of long underwear made of polyster on top and bottom. I always wear waterproof boots but I sometimes wear a pair of thin liner socks(again not made of cotton) with thick hiking socks over the liners. This usually keeps my feet dry and warm. I wear a mock turtleneck under my bodyarmor also and I wear an insulated jacket with two insulation layers over tmy bodarmor. But like a lot of people will tell you, layer up so that you have more options as the temp changes. My 2 cents.
    The first time you trust someone is the first time they go behind your back and pee on your squad.

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  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    871
    I freeze easily so for me I wear Cold Gear Under Armour on top followed by our uniform mock turtlenecks then vest then long sleeve uniform shirt on bottom I wear the cold gear leggings from UA and then my uniform pants. When it gets really cold I wear another pair of sweats on bottom. I usualy end up throwing on my jacket around midnight.... also my cars Heat is on blast every time i get out
    Last edited by LearninginMN; 12-03-2006 at 14:39.
    Greetings. This is not God, This is his close friend Officer Boscorelli. Please pull over - Bosco

  5. #5
    av8tor Guest

    Recommendation of Patrol Gloves

    What type/brand of patrol gloves would you recommend and why? Newbie here trying to adapt to extreme cold weather.

    Thanks

    AV

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    401
    In Southern California, a long sleeve or a light jacket will do you fine.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    Closing In On The Career Goal
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    776
    Personally, I did away with the UA Cold Gear and now dress like this for cold weather and winter camping excursions.

    Base layer/Underwear: DuoFold Varitherm (Extremely Cold Series, they also have a Very Cold Series which may be sufficient depending on the temperatures youare in) or ThermaSilk (TerraMar) Underwear

    Socks: SmartWool

    2nd Layer: DuoFold Polypropene or North Fole long sleeve stretch shirt

    The comment on cotton is dead-on. Cotton retains moisture and cools down your core which is why you should never wear cotton socks, they wick away zero moisture. The key to overall warmth is keeping your hands, feet and head warm.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    871
    Quote Originally Posted by av8tor View Post
    What type/brand of patrol gloves would you recommend and why? Newbie here trying to adapt to extreme cold weather.

    Thanks

    AV
    I have leather hatch gloves, I like them because they're 400 grams thinsulate and leather so they're easy on easy off because i hate writing with them on... but I love them, if I'm outside for a long time I borrowed a pair of my brothers snowmobile gloves with insulation they're ultra warm and are all black w/carbon fiber knuckles can't go wrong.
    Greetings. This is not God, This is his close friend Officer Boscorelli. Please pull over - Bosco

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Posts
    56
    Just to verify, most repsonses state that you layer your stuff UNDER your body armour (vest), right? I seem to have a problem with all those layers compressed under my armour getting sweaty and then cold. My first layer has been a cotton Tee though. I am not a fan of under-armour, but I am hearing positive stuff about some of the other brands of synthetic cold weather gear. I'll look into them. Thanks!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    203
    Silk long johns used to work good for me. They aren't too restricting and light weight. I got mine at a ski shop. I also used some polypropylene stuff, they didn't have under armour when I was on the streets.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    The Sunshine State
    Posts
    146

    Something to keep in mind....

    Synthetic Clothes Off Limits to Marines Outside Bases in Iraq
    By Lance Cpl. Stephen Holt, USMC
    Special to American Forces Press Service

    CAMP TAQADDUM, Iraq, April 12, 2006 – Marines conducting operations outside forward operating bases and camps in Iraq can no longer wear synthetic athletic clothing containing polyester and nylon, Marine Corps commanders have ordered.

    The ban on popular clothing from companies like Under Armour, CoolMax and Nike comes in the wake of concerns that a substantial burn risk is associated with wearing clothing made with these synthetic materials, officials said.
    When exposed to extreme heat and flames, clothing containing some synthetic materials like polyester will melt and can fuse to the skin. This essentially creates a second skin and can lead to horrific, disfiguring burns, said Navy Capt. Lynn E. Welling, the 1st Marine Logistics Group head surgeon.

    Whether on foot patrol or conducting a supply convoy while riding in an armored truck, everyone is at risk to such injuries while outside the wire.
    "Burns can kill you and they're horribly disfiguring. If you're throwing (a melted synthetic material) on top of a burn, basically you have a bad burn with a bunch of plastic melting into your skin, and that's not how you want to go home to your family," said Welling.

    According to Tension Technology International, a company that specializes in synthetic fibers, most man-made fabrics such as nylon, acrylic or polyester will melt when ignited and produce a hot, sticky, melted substance. This can cause extremely severe burns.

    For these reasons, Marines have been limited to wearing clothing made with these materials only while on the relatively safe forward operating bases and camps where encounters with fires and explosions are relatively low, officials said.

    These products have risen in popularity in the past few years and are now sold at military clothing stores. Some companies have come out with product lines specifically catering to military needs. This makes polyester clothing readily available to servicemembers, said Welling.

    The Under Armour company, a favorite among many servicemembers here, advertises that the fabric used to make their garments will pull perspiration from the skin to the outer layer of the clothing. This, the ads say, allows the person wearing it to remain cool and dry in any condition or climate. While these qualities have been a main reason for Marines to stock up on these items, the melting side effect can be a fatal drawback, said Welling.

    This point was driven home recently at a military medical facility at Camp Ramadi, a U.S. military base on the outskirts of the city of Ramadi, arguably one of the most dangerous cities in Iraq. "We had a Marine with significant burn injuries covering around 70 percent of his body," said Navy Cmdr. Joseph F. Rappold, the officer in charge of the medical unit at the base. The Marine was injured when the armored vehicle he was riding in struck an improvised explosive device, causing his polyester shirt to melt to his skin. Even though he was wearing his protective vest, Navy doctors still had to cut the melted undergarment from his torso. His injuries would not have been as severe had he not been wearing a polyester shirt, said Rappold.

    Burns have become a common injury in Iraq as the enemy continues to employ IEDs and roadside bombs. Currently, these hidden explosives are the No. 1 killer of servicemembers in Iraq, said Welling.

    For years, servicemembers with jobs that put then at a high risk of flame exposure, such as pilots and explosive ordnance disposal personnel, were kept from wearing polyester materials because of the extra burn threat. Now, with so many encounters with IED explosions, the Marines are extending this ban to everyone going outside the wire, officials said.

    With the approach of summer, temperatures during some days are expected to hover around 130 degrees Fahrenheit. These blistering temperatures spur many to wear the the moisture-wicking, quick-drying clothing in an attempt to beat the heat and stay cool.

    "I understand it gets to be 150 degrees in a turret during the summer time," said Welling. "My goal is not to make it more uncomfortable or harder on the servicemembers. My job is to make sure that when they hit an IED and are engulfed in flames, they have the best protection possible and the least risk of something (going wrong) that could have been prevented."

    The directive is straightforward and simple, Welling said. "The goal is not to bubble wrap the warrior going outside the gate. The idea is to minimize the (hazards) we have control over," said Welling. Commanders have expressed concern that troops will downplay the problem of wearing wicking materials in combat settings because they think their body armor or uniforms will protect them.

    The camouflage utility uniforms are designed to turn to ash and blow away after the material is burned, but the burn hazard remains, said Welling. She recommends wearing 100 percent cotton clothing while on missions.
    So far, Marines have been responding well to the new regulations.
    "The policy is good because it's designed for safety and is about keeping Marines in the fight," said Cpl. Jason Lichtefeld, a military policeman with the 1st Marine Logistics Group, who plans to ensure his Marines comply with the new rules.

    Even Marines who never venture off base should be aware of the risks associated with wearing the wicking fabrics, officials said. For example, a Marine's high-performance undershirt recently started smoking when an electrical current shocked him. Fortunately, it didn't catch on fire or melt, but the potential was there, said Welling.

    Officials acknowledged that high-performance apparel may be the best way to stay cool when working in a low-risk environment with a minimal chance of exposure to flames or intense heat. "We've got a great piece of gear, but when you put it in the wrong environment, it could cause more problems than it's worth," said Welling.


    Just something to keep in mind. I realize that being a LE officer in the States is a lot different from being in the military and serving in a combat zone. However, being a first responder, you never know when you may have to pull somebody from a burning car or house. I don't think I'd want to have a long sleeve Under Armour shirt on beneath my duty uniform in that case.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    46
    Quote Originally Posted by cheftocop View Post
    Just to verify, most repsonses state that you layer your stuff UNDER your body armour (vest), right? I seem to have a problem with all those layers compressed under my armour getting sweaty and then cold. My first layer has been a cotton Tee though. I am not a fan of under-armour, but I am hearing positive stuff about some of the other brands of synthetic cold weather gear. I'll look into them. Thanks!
    Well, make sure you have A layer under your vest though. That vest will be RANK and NASTY if you don't put some barrier between yourself and the vest. Like I said earlier, I want my other layers on top ofthe vest soe that if I wanna remove one, I don't have to take my vest off to do it.


 

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