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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2000
    Posts
    7,369
    Quote Originally Posted by This User View Post
    No, I never meant it as the officer stopping the ambulance on purpose. I meant the officer's car blocking the intersection (too much traffic, not waiting at crosswalk on your side) and an ambulance theoretically comes by and is stuck and has to wait 10-20 seconds for the officer or another car to move. I believe this was not properly communicated.
    So...your example when discussing the "multiple times" you "have witnessed law enforcers" break the law...was theoretical. OK then. Moving on.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    112
    Quote Originally Posted by nsedet View Post
    So...your example when discussing the "multiple times" you "have witnessed law enforcers" break the law...was theoretical. OK then. Moving on.
    No, just the ambulance scenario. I failed to provide enough details, I apologize. I have witnessed a police officer blocking an intersection, that part is not theoretical; however, because of the high volume of ambulance runs in my city, it is bound for an ambulance to be blocked by them eventually (theoretically).

    Ambulances have enough maneuvering to do without the frustration of individuals blocking traffic light intersections.

    Regardless on the confusion and arguments, I have obtained the replies I was seeking and appreciate everyone's input on this thread. I additionally apologize for the debates and upsetting remarks I have created due to the lack of communication.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,941
    Quote Originally Posted by This User View Post
    No, just the ambulance scenario. I failed to provide enough details, I apologize. I have witnessed a police officer blocking an intersection, that part is not theoretical; however, because of the high volume of ambulance runs in my city, it is bound for an ambulance to be blocked by them eventually (theoretically).

    Ambulances have enough maneuvering to do without the frustration of individuals blocking traffic light intersections.

    Regardless on the confusion and arguments, I have obtained the replies I was seeking and appreciate everyone's input on this thread. I additionally apologize for the debates and upsetting remarks I have created due to the lack of communication.
    Your statements in prior posts are confusing and you are failing to communicate. This of course rests at your feet, so please reflect on your ability to communicate and broadcast the correct message as it is lacking.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Western Hemisphere
    Posts
    541
    GA law is 19y/o for POST cert; and there are rural cities/counties employing 19y/o's. My experience with the 21y/o age requirement in GA, as a public safety manager and public safety officer (police/fire/EMS provider/manager), is insurance policy minimum age requirements. For instance, on our fireside, one was not permitted to actually drive the apparatus until reaching 25y/o. That was simply due to the insurance policy. Same thing with the 21y/o police officer minimum age requirement. It all depends on the city/county's insurance carrier. And I can instill some serious maturity into a rookie cop, whether 19y/o or 21y/o, in a short period of time. I think it's all about the elder trainers' & supervisors' morals & values being properly bestowed upon the youngsters. That just seems to be lacking, in my view, these days in this "me" world.
    Stay safe!

    FedAgent

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    112
    Quote Originally Posted by FedAgent View Post
    GA law is 19y/o for POST cert; and there are rural cities/counties employing 19y/o's. My experience with the 21y/o age requirement in GA, as a public safety manager and public safety officer (police/fire/EMS provider/manager), is insurance policy minimum age requirements. For instance, on our fireside, one was not permitted to actually drive the apparatus until reaching 25y/o. That was simply due to the insurance policy. Same thing with the 21y/o police officer minimum age requirement. It all depends on the city/county's insurance carrier. And I can instill some serious maturity into a rookie cop, whether 19y/o or 21y/o, in a short period of time. I think it's all about the elder trainers' & supervisors' morals & values being properly bestowed upon the youngsters. That just seems to be lacking, in my view, these days in this "me" world.
    Thank you for your input, it is very informative for me.


 

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