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Thread: Oral Board

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    218

    Oral Board

    I have been invited to an oral board interview with a local LE agency. From what I understand, the board consists of 2 officers and a "community member". I would need a vote of yes from 2 of the three members to continue with the process.

    I understand that the process varies from department to department, but can anyone tell me what I can generally expect?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    159

    Oral Board

    There is a good chance that they will have a list of questions and each one may take a turn asking one. Be prepared to think while they are asking the question and make eye contact with everybody. They might be situational questions. For example, you make a traffic stop and the chief of police is off duty and smells of an alcoholic beverage, what do you do? Another common one in the past was you respond to an alarm at a business and as you are walking out you see a fellow officer grab a candy bar and put it in his pocket. What do you do. There are lots of other typical questions on line if you do some searching. They could have some very open ended questions that give you the opportunity to "sell" yourself. For example, what makes you the best candidate here? The other standard advice applies, too. Be clean shaven, wear a suit a tie, polished shoes, leave your cell phone somewhere else, don't chew gum, etc.

    Also, a number of people suggest handing each interviewer a copy of your resume'. I may or may not suggest doing that because I have sort of mixed feelings on that one. Some places might not want them and it might lead to an awkward situation.

    Also, learn as much as you can about the agency and the community served. Look at the local newspaper, which might even be on line, to see what issues are going on right now. Drive around the community ahead of time to size it up. Sometimes even a stop at the local library can yield some very valuable information.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    218
    Thanks. I will start researching the questions and the community.

    I don't think I will hand them my resume. I did ask the officer who invited me to the interview for details. Unless I hear otherwise, I won't bring a resume.

    However, whenever I go to an interview, I usually ask for business cards from the interviewers so that I can send a thank you e-mail later.

    Would this be inappropriate/awkward for the board?

    Thanks.

  4. #4
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    Apr 2011
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    What about if asked what to do if I see a fellow officer do something wrong? If, for example, I am in a situation where I happen to pull over a fellow officer suspected of driving while intoxicated, is it wrong to offer him/her a ride home in the patrol car? Could I suggest that he call someone to pick him/her up? I certainly do not want to let the officer continue driving. However, if it someone that I know is otherwise a good person and officer, I would want that officer to have her reputation and career tarnished for what could have been one mistake.

    What if I pull over the mayor of the town?

    Thanks for any insight.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    159

    Oral Board

    This still may vary depending on the agency and location. It has changed in my area, though. When I first started cop work in 1980, I don't recall hearing about an off-duty cop being arrested for drunk driving. They probably were given a ride home. That wouldn't fly around here these days.

    The other option that I have used, not often, but I have used it, is to call another agency. For example, lets say an officer from my agency is off-duty and involved in a collision in my jurisdiction. I think it worthwhile to consider calling the State Patrol in to investigate the accident. That way, if there is any allegation of impropriety later, you can show that another agency did the investigation. While it probably won't satisfy everybody, it might go a long ways to calming some people.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    218
    Thanks, Jim.

    While I would not want to hurt another officer, I also want to do the right thing. Further, one could rightly argue that the officer, friend, or family member hurt themselves with their actions.

    I believe when in doubt, it's best to contact a supervisor, or call another agency, as you suggested.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    Curious about another scenario I came across: if a cop passes by a bar and sees a patron leave the bar and then immediately re-enter the bar upon seeing the cop, does a cop then have enough probably cause to follow the patron in the bar and start asking him questions/for his id?

  8. #8
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    Apr 2000
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    Quote Originally Posted by chasmain View Post
    Curious about another scenario I came across: if a cop passes by a bar and sees a patron leave the bar and then immediately re-enter the bar upon seeing the cop, does a cop then have enough probably cause to follow the patron in the bar and start asking him questions/for his id?
    I would keep in mind that oral boards are meant to gauge YOUR responses to questions - not the responses generated by asking them of others beforehand.

    Just be honest and give each question some thought and you should be fine.
    "I don't share your greed...the only card I need...is the Ace of Spades, the Ace of Spades..."

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    218
    Thanks for the reminder. I personally would use my own judgement based on my education and experience. If I am stuck, I would defer to a supervisors.


 

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