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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Behind a desk, crying
    Posts
    2,515

    Question for you Retirees.

    For the recently, or not so recently, retired.

    As some amongst us get to within seeing distance of that retirement eligibility light at the end of the tunnel. Is there any advice those of you who have retired could pass on? Something you wish you'd done? Something you'd wished you hadn't done? Anything at all?

    Thanks in advance.
    It is better to be feared than loved, if you cannot be both. - Niccolo Machiavelli

    Most people respect the badge, everybody respects the gun.

    I have neither the time nor the inclination to explain myself to a man who rises and sleeps under the blanket of the very freedom that I provide, and then questions the manner in which I provide it. - Colonel Jessup

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    6,353
    If I were somewhere on the spectrum of getting close to eligible toward approaching mandatory, I would be keeping a close eye on proposals to change benefits or extend retirement age that have come out of the Administration and the Hill. Sometimes decisions kind of get made for you.

    I had 30 days between retirement and a new gig. If I had it to do over I probably would have tried to structure more time in between, just to decompress and reset a little. Took 6 months between that first outside job and the current one and it helped me to evaluate paths and opportunities a little more thoughtfully.

    Approaching retirement eligibility, you begin to focus, as you should on the actual options and acts of retirement. Best time, forms, etc. If I were doing it over, I would also have begun the process of preparing the options and acts of post retirement. For something over 20 years, we have been in a closed loop. Even competitive promotions were within the 4 corners of the language and culture of our agency and law enforcement. We could effectively communicate our skills and experience in a shared jargon. It worked out fine for me, but in hindsight, I could have looked around at opportunities earlier, paid more attention to translating my KSA's into business speak, applied for different positions and gone through additional interviews (even if I was planning to decline an offer) just to shake off the cobwebs.

    I sometimes describe this to friends who ask as the effort to change "I have overseen the development of raid plans for high risk arrest and search warrants and selected and deployed specially armed teams in the service of those warrants. The developed plans were carried out with positive results and nobody getting killed or killing anybody" to "In high pressure situations, I have developed and deployed successful strategies and selected and supervised diverse personnel in the successful implementation of that strategy and the complete achievement of desired organization goals." That is really the same thing but translated for the audience. There are websites and publications about crafting resumes and effective communication in interviews that you can benefit from spending time with, but you will have to figure out how to express how your experience fits into what a potential employer is looking for.


    As you close in on actually going, it helps to work being mentally good with being gone. We all know more than one retiree who found themselves lost a little once it was past. Some folks carry a beef with the agency into retirement like a torch for an old boy or girlfriend. In my opinion, some of that is a problem with achieving separation. A little visualization practice as you approach retirement might help. I'm good, I'm gone, friends are friends, what's next?

    Last, as always, good comms on the homefront. As my wife said one time, "I've been reviewing our vows. "Sickness and Health, check; richer, poorer, check; better or for worse, check. Nothing in there about you being home for lunch every day."
    ret.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,912
    Quote Originally Posted by Big Sexy View Post
    For the recently, or not so recently, retired.

    As some amongst us get to within seeing distance of that retirement eligibility light at the end of the tunnel. Is there any advice those of you who have retired could pass on? Something you wish you'd done? Something you'd wished you hadn't done? Anything at all?

    Thanks in advance.
    Big, everyone I talk to on this topic is the last year or two (or three) focus on networking and attending local ASIS, CFE, etc type chapter meetings. Polish the resume. Etc.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Behind a desk, crying
    Posts
    2,515
    Appreciate it fellas. BIG is a couple of years over 20, fast approaching eligibility and starting to feel that "bug" scratching at him. He's already submitted for a retirement package estimate and is just trying to chart some sort of path towards an exit strategy; if he decides to go.
    It is better to be feared than loved, if you cannot be both. - Niccolo Machiavelli

    Most people respect the badge, everybody respects the gun.

    I have neither the time nor the inclination to explain myself to a man who rises and sleeps under the blanket of the very freedom that I provide, and then questions the manner in which I provide it. - Colonel Jessup

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    1,201
    Quote Originally Posted by ATF SAC View Post
    I had 30 days between retirement and a new gig. If I had it to do over I probably would have tried to structure more time in between, just to decompress and reset a little.
    I took almost a year off to decompress and that was obviously too much. On the other hand, I know a guy who retired on Friday and started a new job on Monday. He's still with that job 17 years later. There is a happy medium, I would say 3-5 months before you jump back in.

    But as others have said, starting lining up your ducks a year or so before you pull the pin.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,912
    Quote Originally Posted by Big Sexy View Post
    Appreciate it fellas. BIG is a couple of years over 20, fast approaching eligibility and starting to feel that "bug" scratching at him. He's already submitted for a retirement package estimate and is just trying to chart some sort of path towards an exit strategy; if he decides to go.
    Brother, I am going as soon as eligible, which is 25 year mark for me. 25 years (QTR of a century) is plenty of time to give your soul and heart to a "mission". I did my part, have a heck of a lot of accomplishments, however time to turn the baton over to the next generation and pursue new, and different, challenges. Some of which are attending my kids sports games and weekend fishing at the lake with no cell / no pager and not being on any duty roster.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Behind a desk, crying
    Posts
    2,515
    BIG would increase you guys' already stellar reputations, but the forum says BIG has to spread it around a bit more.

    Sage advice all, and BIG must say the itch is getting stronger and stronger as time goes by. Counting BIG's 6 years as an active member of Uncle Sam's Misguided Children, at eligibility BIG will have 31 years and as satpak77 has already pointed out, more than enough time of giving your heart and soul to a mission.

    BIG has recently been reassigned to a white collar crime group, yeah, BIG was surprised also, no more gangbangers & drug dealers, which may breath a little bit of longevity into BIG's overall jaded outlook of the world. Still busy, just without the continuous exigency, call outs and physical/mental toll of the grind of a street agent.

    Time will indeed tell.
    It is better to be feared than loved, if you cannot be both. - Niccolo Machiavelli

    Most people respect the badge, everybody respects the gun.

    I have neither the time nor the inclination to explain myself to a man who rises and sleeps under the blanket of the very freedom that I provide, and then questions the manner in which I provide it. - Colonel Jessup

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,912
    Quote Originally Posted by Big Sexy View Post
    BIG would increase you guys' already stellar reputations, but the forum says BIG has to spread it around a bit more.

    Sage advice all, and BIG must say the itch is getting stronger and stronger as time goes by. Counting BIG's 6 years as an active member of Uncle Sam's Misguided Children, at eligibility BIG will have 31 years and as satpak77 has already pointed out, more than enough time of giving your heart and soul to a mission.

    BIG has recently been reassigned to a white collar crime group, yeah, BIG was surprised also, no more gangbangers & drug dealers, which may breath a little bit of longevity into BIG's overall jaded outlook of the world. Still busy, just without the continuous exigency, call outs and physical/mental toll of the grind of a street agent.

    Time will indeed tell.
    Big get your CFE or at least start hitting the ACFE chapter meetings in your area. Also Cyber Security is the next big thing, attended some "Cyber Meetups" in my area and when folks stood up and introduced themselves, they loved me. They LOVED that I admitted I knew LITTLE about computer security but wanted to LEARN, however I "brought a law enforcement mindset to the table, I hope I can find a role where I can make a contribution"

    THEY LOVED THAT

    I MEAN, MAJOR LOVE

    good luck dude

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    26
    If you are punching out early (50 or younger), you will most likely want to work full time again. It would be best to apply for prospective jobs in the corporate security world while you are still employed with the G (but ready to hand in your papers)...it makes you more marketable.

    If no desire to work a second career, then you should stay until the end (57, or in some cases, 60) to maximize your pension....assuming you can stick it out.

    There are also opportunities out there (not many, albeit) to be a reemployed annuitant. Not a bad gig, if you can land one, and are willing to temporarily relocate. Normally term or temp positions for a couple years, but I know some who have done it for 5 or more years.

    I punched out at 50, and chose to work part time...as a 1099 self employed contractor, doing background investigations for the gov't. Basically beer money, but it got me out of the house. BI's are a whole different subject. I got bored, and went the reemployed annuitant route (twice) to break the routine. Then back to the BI's...there will always be BI's.

    Don't forget to enjoy your retirement, too...you earned it. No regrets.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Henderson, NV
    Posts
    5,539
    Check to see if there is an American Society for Industrial Security in your area. Join ASIS, do a little studying and earn your Certified Protection Professional (CPP) designation. As stated above, get your CFE too. Then attend your local meetings (while STILL on the job) and network the hell out of the organizations. Join LinkedIn and get your face and name out there in networks. If you're in a Supervisory position in LE, don't sweat taking a working security (vs policy development) position. You've got a lot to learn about corporate life and dealing with very senior corporate types (C Suite - CEOs, CFOs, COOs, etc).

    I spent almost 20 years as a corporate type and it was very lucrative and I got to see a lot of the world (OK, maybe some places that I would have preferred to just call).

    There are some excellent 'how-to' books out there. I'd recommend self-helps on "How to Work a Room" for meeting and schmoozing at luncheons, cocktails, etc. Also, develop an 'elevator pitch' (A NTE 3 min talk to a senior exec about who you are and what you do and how you can helming him/her) You'll use it thousands of times during your post-retirement years!!
    Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming "Wow! What a Ride!
    Hunter S. Thompson

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Behind a desk, crying
    Posts
    2,515
    Appreciate the sage advice, one and all.
    It is better to be feared than loved, if you cannot be both. - Niccolo Machiavelli

    Most people respect the badge, everybody respects the gun.

    I have neither the time nor the inclination to explain myself to a man who rises and sleeps under the blanket of the very freedom that I provide, and then questions the manner in which I provide it. - Colonel Jessup

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    152

    Question For You Retirees

    Quote Originally Posted by dmclark View Post
    Check to see if there is an American Society for Industrial Security in your area. Join ASIS, do a little studying and earn your Certified Protection Professional (CPP) designation. As stated above, get your CFE too. Then attend your local meetings (while STILL on the job) and network the hell out of the organizations. Join LinkedIn and get your face and name out there in networks...
    You have piqued my interest. For the record, I was a local copper. I did over 10 years with a small, suburban PD. Then over 17 years as a deputy sheriff. I had lots of varied assignments, BUT not much general investigations.

    I am now in a uniformed quasi-federal job that military types would call force protection.

    I am goo don degrees. I have an AS, BS, and MS, but not accounting, finance, or anything like that. Just plain old, boring Law Enforcement, Criminal Justice, and Public Administration degrees.

    Anyway, would joining ASIS, and getting the CPP, still be worthwhile for someone like me? What about the CFE? Do I have to get some other college accounting classes before trying to tackle the CFE? I don't want to sound like I am a total hard sell on doing these things, but it is just that the PD and SO I was at didn't seem to care much that I had an advanced degree. The Chief and Sheriff stiill promoted who they wanted, when they wanted.

    However, if these things hold some weight in the private sector, where do I sign up? Oh, and at 56 years old, I am not ready to re-retire again just yet, but I also don't want to waste either my time or money!


 

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