Hello and welcome to our community! Is this your first visit?
Register

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 26 of 26
  1. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,941
    Quote Originally Posted by IrishGrunt View Post
    “Cyber certs to get are the CISSP. The is the defacto gold standard. One "level down" would be the Security A+.“

    What are the recommended sources for Security A+ and CISSP Training/cert?
    https://www.isc2.org/Certifications/...2AADB185C.ashx

    "Must have experience in two of the 8 domains". For 95% of the 1811s, this will be 1) Security and Risk Management and 7) Security Operations

    a variety of "boot camps" exist but the cheapest options are "prep courses" at the local college. It may take some digging around on internet. One example of an offering at a local college: https://www.collin.edu/ce/courses/cissp.html

    There is a little known, FREE online course training, operated by DHS, at https://fedvte.usalearning.gov/

    You need to register but it is fairly painless. your 1811 status and .GOV email will qualify you

    Good Luck

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    737
    Thanks. Any recommended route for Security A+? Searches for that yield what appears to be a lot of chaff covering the wheat.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,941
    Quote Originally Posted by IrishGrunt View Post
    Thanks. Any recommended route for Security A+? Searches for that yield what appears to be a lot of chaff covering the wheat.
    ** I hold neither cert *** (Disclaimer)

    I was however advised by those in the field to just skip A+ and get the CISSP. A+ is for someone with less than 5 years in one of the domains, for example, a college grad. For most of the 1811's, they can just do CISSP

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    737
    Good scoop. Thanks. I was thinking of the A+ as a way to see if it was truly interesting before diving deeper.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    West of Ireland
    Posts
    645
    Quote Originally Posted by satpak77 View Post
    and now they are 57, 58 year old "senior citizens" (no disrespect) doing backgrounds on contract workers at the local military base.
    I'm one of those who does BI's on an OPM contractor, but my difference is that I incurred a LOD injury which led to an OPM disability annuity. Forty percent of your last 52 weeks salary, taxable, is nothing one can live on for the next 20 plus years......anyway, getting back to doing BI's:
    DON'T DO IT!!!
    It's not investigating in the same sense as criminal investigations. You ask a bunch of boilerplate questions and you ask why someone reported their cell phone number as their home number. You ask other deep, probing questions about their SF-86, with answers generally being "I didn't understand the question." And those answers come from people with JD's and PhD's. The SF-86 is probably one of the most screwed up forms in the G. You just push cases through; OPM collects information pretty much just for the sale of collecting information to show Congress that OPM/NBIB is doing something. And then some of the contract companies go beyond that, getting more useless information just to show OPM that they're getting additional (and useless) information. You will quickly become frustrated with doing the BI work. You will also find your work being reviewed by some 24 year old who thinks their work will fast track them to the FBI BAU; their careers choice when they graduated from Penn State with a BS in CJ was doing BI reviews or working as a customer service rep at Enterprise Rent a Car. Driving for Uber is probably a better option than doing BI work.
    ESFLEA
    Life is what happens while you're planning other things.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Behind a desk, crying
    Posts
    2,558
    A wee bit off topic, but in the same retirement universe.

    For the esteemed and knowledgable elders of the board, if one received a disability rating years past, due to a LOD injury, how, if at all, does that come into play upon retiring?

    Asking for a fri...
    It is better to be feared than loved, if you cannot be both. - Niccolo Machiavelli

    Most people respect the badge, everybody respects the gun.

    I have neither the time nor the inclination to explain myself to a man who rises and sleeps under the blanket of the very freedom that I provide, and then questions the manner in which I provide it. - Colonel Jessup

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,941
    Quote Originally Posted by esflea View Post
    Driving for Uber is probably a better option than doing BI work.
    yep....

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    West of Ireland
    Posts
    645
    Quote Originally Posted by Big Sexy View Post
    A wee bit off topic, but in the same retirement universe.

    For the esteemed and knowledgable elders of the board, if one received a disability rating years past, due to a LOD injury, how, if at all, does that come into play upon retiring?

    Asking for a fri...
    Probably no effect; it's not like getting a disability rating upon discharge from the Military.


    If you suffered a "loss of function" to your legs or arms, or loss of eyesight, hearing, limbs, digits, or you have a deformity to your face, then you are entitled to a Scheduled Award. Unless Department of Labor OWCP regulations have changed, you can apply for an Award years after the injury, just as long as you've met Maximum Medical Improvement. I got an award several years after shoulder surgery for rotator cuff repair, thanks to an overzealous fellow agent who though twisting my arm beyond its range of motion was a good idea during arrest techniques in-service training.
    ESFLEA
    Life is what happens while you're planning other things.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Behind a desk, crying
    Posts
    2,558
    Quote Originally Posted by esflea View Post
    Probably no effect; it's not like getting a disability rating upon discharge from the Military.


    If you suffered a "loss of function" to your legs or arms, or loss of eyesight, hearing, limbs, digits, or you have a deformity to your face, then you are entitled to a Scheduled Award. Unless Department of Labor OWCP regulations have changed, you can apply for an Award years after the injury, just as long as you've met Maximum Medical Improvement. I got an award several years after shoulder surgery for rotator cuff repair, thanks to an overzealous fellow agent who though twisting my arm beyond its range of motion was a good idea during arrest techniques in-service training.
    BIG was curious as to if it was akin to the military disability rating.

    BIG has done the whole scheduled award thing a few years ago. He's lost some mobility in an appendage and had hardware added and ended up with a 16% disability rating. Mind you, he's gone on to join two other agencies since receiving this, so though he might be disabled, BIG isn't disabled. If that makes sense.

    BIG has thought bout revisiting and having another Max Med. Improvement evaluation done, it's been 18 years since the last, and see if he's gotten any worse. The mechanism to actually do so seems a bit convoluted. Any suggestions?
    It is better to be feared than loved, if you cannot be both. - Niccolo Machiavelli

    Most people respect the badge, everybody respects the gun.

    I have neither the time nor the inclination to explain myself to a man who rises and sleeps under the blanket of the very freedom that I provide, and then questions the manner in which I provide it. - Colonel Jessup

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    60
    Hey guys, this forum has been a big help to me and I am quickly approaching a FLETC date. In the mean time, I work as a cyber security consultant/auditor and can attest to the HUGE need for security folks.

    CISSP is considered the gold standard, as are any of the SANS certifications (I know FBI will pay for its cyber agents to get these and the associated training but not sure about others). How do you fit? Well I can tell you that my fed background (I was only an intern with two separate 3 letter agencies) directly related to my first job in this field. The writing and interview skills gained as an 1811 are directly related to what I do as a consultant. Another certification that is less technical that you could consider is the Certified Information Systems Auditor (CISA), which will lead to audit roles.

    MAKE SURE YOU MEET THE MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS FOR THE CERTS. SANS does not have prereqs, but others like the CISA and CISSP do.

    To get more technical knowledge, honestly the best way is to pick up a few books (Systems Administration, Networking, CISSP guide, etc.) and read through them and try to find some practical application for what you read. There are also a ton of courses out there on Udemy, Coursera, Cybrary, etc. Some are free, some are very low cost (Under $20) and they are great tools to learn. A degree in the field is helpful but certainly not necessary, especially if you have a clearance and certifications.

    On the money side, my first job was at a university and low paying but offered significant educational incentives (Masters degree was at an 80% discount, JD/Med/PHD at a 50% discount) which would help break into the field. The consulting gig pays $70k and I was fresh out of school.

    Let me know if you have any additional questions!

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    West of Ireland
    Posts
    645
    Quote Originally Posted by Big Sexy View Post
    BIG was curious as to if it was akin to the military disability rating.

    BIG has done the whole scheduled award thing a few years ago. He's lost some mobility in an appendage and had hardware added and ended up with a 16% disability rating. Mind you, he's gone on to join two other agencies since receiving this, so though he might be disabled, BIG isn't disabled. If that makes sense.

    BIG has thought bout revisiting and having another Max Med. Improvement evaluation done, it's been 18 years since the last, and see if he's gotten any worse. The mechanism to actually do so seems a bit convoluted. Any suggestions?
    I'm not a vet so I really can't be the expert on the disability rating.

    As for scheduled awards, if the loss of function gets worse, you can submit a new request for an additional award. If your doctor determines you've gone from an 18% to a 23% (for instance) you should be entitled to additional money.

    I actually worked several years with the loss of function in the arm. It didn't help my shooting scores, though. I fortunately had a pain management/rehabilitation physician do both reports (arm and spine/leg) which wasn't questioned by Department of Labor. Labor could have sent me to one of their quacks but fortunately that didn't happen.


    I probably can't recommend a lawyer here because it could amount to free advertising, but there's a law firm in upstate NY and there's a sole practitioner in SE Pennsylvania who I hear are highly recommended about this sort of thing.
    ESFLEA
    Life is what happens while you're planning other things.


 

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •